drop off laundry near me


0
Share via
1 share
laundrytips 142534

Monarch – Edward VII (until 6 May), George V (starting 6 May)

Prime Minister – H. H. Asquith (Liberal)

As we celebrate International Women’s Day, it is an appropriate time to think back through our mothers and grandmothers to more than 100 years ago.

What was life like for ordinary women living in Britain before the development of a national health service, a social welfare system and modern household appliances?

All women in 1910, irrespective of social class background, were seen as second-class citizens – a fact underlined by the denial to them of the parliamentary vote.

And all women were encouraged from childhood to strive to the ideal of serving others, to consider the interests of their menfolk first rather than their own.

Since most women were expected to become full-time wives and mothers, rather than earn their own living, options in life were limited.

This was especially so for ordinary, working-class girls and women who had fewer choices than their middle-class sisters and lived lives of toil and drudgery.

Working-class girls who attended state elementary schools were taught a limited curriculum.

Lessons focused on the 3 Rs (reading, writing and arithmetic), a little geography and history, and a large chunk of domestic subjects, such as needle-work, house manage-ment, cookery, laundry work and childcare.

It would appear that few girls valued this domestic emphasis in their schooling, preferring their mother’s training at home.

Grace Foakes, who spent her childhood in East London in the early 20th century recollected in her autobiography My Part of the River: “If we did the housewifery course we were taught to sweep, dust, polish, make beds and bath a life-size doll.

“We had great fun on this course, for it was held in a house set aside for the purpose and, with only one teacher, we were quick to take advantage when she went to inspect another part of the house. We jumped on the bed, threw pillows, drowned the doll and swept dirt under the mats.”

Other women remembered how the collars of men’s shirts washed, starched and ironed in school laundry classes were promptly re-washed by a schoolgirl’s unimpressed and house-proud mother.

Although the age of compulsory school attendance had been raised to 14 in 1899, many working-class girls left a year earlier, on possession of a labour certificate to enter dead-end, poorly-paid jobs, especially in domestic service.

The lowest paid was the maid-ofall-work or general servant, earning £12 to £18 a year, plus board and lodging. Other single working-class women might earn 13 shillings a week (65p) in the non-textile industries, but even that was not enough for a fully independent existence.

Marriage became a practical necessity for working-class women, few of whom wanted to be left on the shelf.

Once married, working-class husbands were usually against their wives going out to work, believing that a family wage was the way to earn respectability – and keep their wages high.

But most wives lived in a cycle of poverty, especially in urban areas where working-class families lived in damp, dark, overcrowded tenements infested with bugs.

When times got tough, the family wage would be supplemented by a wife asking kin or neighbours for help, or taking in lodgers or washing. Credit or the pawn shop were sometimes used too.

Most working-class wives were ignorant about birth control and had to manage a household of six children and two adults on a pound a week. After rent of 7 shillings (35 pence) was paid out, only 12 shillings (60 pence) was left for coal, gas, burial insurance, clothes, cleaning materials and savings.

Such conditions took their toll on the health of all the family, but women were hardest hit. They scrimped and scraped, often depriving themselves of food to buy a ‘relish’ for a husband’s tea or bacon for his breakfast.

Even when pregnant, a wife might live on bread and jam. Often the soonto-be-born baby died young.

“No one but mothers who have gone through the ordeal of pregnancy half starved, to finally bring a child into the world, to live a living death for nine months, can understand what it means,” wrote one sad mother from those times in a letter to Margaret Llewelyn Davies for her book Maternity, Letters from Working Women.

Since contraceptives could not be advertised or openly displayed, some women tried well-known but dangerous methods to end a pregnancy – knitting needles, bottles of gin, hot baths, falling downstairs.

Often they failed and it was not uncommon for women to spend 15 years nursing or expecting babies. Keeping a damp tenement clean was hard work, and all done by manual labour. Few husbands helped with housework, shopping or childcare.

Since the only heating was by open fire, the grate had to be cleaned daily and scuttles of coal brought up and down stairs from the basement.

Washing was a particular chore since there was no hot water, only a cold tap, usually shared. Water had to be heated in a copper pan for washing clothes in a ‘dolly tub’ and children would be given a bath in a tin tub, once a week, before the fire. Few homes had indoor lavatories but shared an outside privy.

It was the deplorable state of working-class women’s lives that prompted Emmeline Pankhurst, in 1903, to found the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU), a women-only organisation that was to campaign for the vote for women.

She believed the lack of the vote was the key factor underpinning the inferior status of women in Edwardian Britain and they “would remain a servant class until they lifted themselves out of it”.

The campaign her suffragettes fought was never a single issue campaign but a broad based reform movement that sought to bring equality for women in the family, education, employment and the law.

Now women are still not equal in all aspects of British life – but we have travelled a long way from the wretched conditions experienced by so many of our foremothers more than 100 years ago.

Pretoria Pit disaster

The Pretoria Pit disaster was a mining accident on 21 December 1910, when an underground explosion occurred at the Hulton Colliery Bank Pit No. 3, known as the Pretoria Pit, in Over Hulton, Westhoughton, then in the historic county of Lancashire, in North West England. A total of 344 men & boys lost their lives.

There were approximately 2,400 workers employed by the Hulton Colliery Company in 1910. On the morning of 21 December, approximately 900 workers arrived for the day shift. They were working five coal seams of the Manchester Coalfield; the Trencherbone, Plodder, Yard, Three-Quarters and Arley mines.

At 7:50am, there was an explosion in the Plodder Mine, which was thought to have been caused by an accumulation of gas from a roof collapse the previous day.

That day 349 workers descended the No 3 bank pit shaft to work in the Plodder, Yard and Three Quarters mines. Of those, only four survived to be brought to the surface. One died immediately and one the next day. The two survivors were Joseph Staveley and William Davenport. In addition one man died in the Arley Mine of No. 4 Pit, bringing the total to 344. There was a final fatality that day, William Turton, who died while fighting a fire in No. 3 pit. The men who were working the other mines in the pit worked from No.4 shaft were unharmed. It was the second worst mining accident in England, and the third worst in Britain; after the Oaks Colliery explosion and Senghenydd Colliery Disaster.

Many of the fatalities were from the same family. The worst affected was the Tyldesley family in which Mrs Miriam Tyldesley lost her husband, four sons and two brothers. A relief fund was established for the families and dependants and a total of £145,000 was raised. In 1911, dependants were compensated and given annuities from a number of sources (including the fund). All the victims were members of Permanent Relief Societies to which they paid contributions weekly and most had private life insurance with friendly societies and all were covered by the Workmen’s Compensation Act 1906 which brought together all (except the private insurance) the compensation to produce a lump sum and annuity for the dependants.

John Baxter was the last recipient of payments from the Hulton Colliery Explosion (1910) Relief Fund when he died in January 1973. The fund was dissolved in 1975 and the remaining assets transferred to other miners’ relief funds.

King Edward VII dies in Buckingham Palace

Edward VII would wait a long time to be King and would then rule for only 9 years but his reign was so eventful that it would become known as an “era” of its own, rather than just a brief extension of his legendary mother’s. He had epitomised the leisured elite during his long decades in Victoria’s shadow and the word “Edwardian” is often used to describe just that, a way of life which didn’t quite die with him but would be consigned to history not long afterwards. The tide was already beginning to turn though and Edward was called into action over a constitutional crisis, his intervention effectively dragging Parliament into the 20th century and enabling a new dawn of welfare reform which would change the face of his nation. He tenure though was short and much of it was spent preparing his son and successor George V for a longer rule through even choppier waters.

Hawley Harvey Crippen

Hawley Harvey Crippen (September 11, 1862 – November 23, 1910), usually known as Dr. Crippen, was an American homeopath, ear and eye specialist and medicine dispenser. He was hanged in Pentonville Prison in London for the murder of his wife Cora Henrietta Crippen, and was the first suspect to be captured with the aid of wireless telegraphy.

In 2007, DNA evidence questioned the identification of the body found in Crippen’s cellar that was supposed to be Crippen’s wife. This evidence suggested that the remains discovered in his cellar were, in fact, those of a male person. These conclusions are disputed.

Throughout the proceedings and at his sentencing, Crippen showed no remorse for his wife and concern for only his lover’s reputation. After just 27 minutes of deliberations, the jury found Crippen guilty of murder. He was hanged by John Ellis, assisted by William Willis, at 9 a.m. on 23 November 1910 at Pentonville Prison, London.

Le Neve was charged only with being an accessory after the fact and acquitted. She emigrated to the United States on the morning of her lover’s execution. At his request, her photograph was placed in his coffin and buried with him.

Although Crippen’s grave in the prison grounds is not marked by a stone, tradition has it that soon after his burial, a rose bush was planted over it. Some of his relatives in Michigan have begun lobbying for his remains to be repatriated to the United States.

illustrated ‘saucy’ seaside postcards

Bamforth & Co Ltd was started in 1870 by James Bamforth, a portrait photographer in Holmfirth, West Yorkshire. In 1883 he began to specialise in making lantern slides. During 1898 ‘Bamforth & Co. Ltd’ started making silent monochrome films with the Riley Brothers of Bradford, West Yorkshire, who had been making films since 1896. James Bamforth’s expertise with lantern slides proved invaluable in the film making. They used a camera developed by Bradford cine inventor Cecil Wray. This partnership with Riley and Bamforth, known as ‘RAB’ films lasted until 1900. Though film production was restarted in 1913 it was again stopped in 1915, when the film production was changed to the new named ‘Holmfirth Producing Company, which quickly moved operations to London. The last Holmfirth film, Meg o’ the Woods, emerged in February 1918.

In 1910 Bamforth & Co Ltd started making illustrated ‘saucy’ seaside postcards which, like his films, were exported worldwide for sale. The company was bought out by the Dennis Printing Company, in Scarborough during the early 1980s. Following the demise of Dennis the ‘Bamforth & Co’ name and postcards rights to over 50,000 designs were purchased by Ian Wallace in 2001.

Although the Bamforth company was best known in the United Kingdom for producing a wide range of topographical and tourist postcards as well as ‘saucy’ seaside cards, what is less well known was their rich history of filmmaking. Drawing heavily on their work with magic lantern cinema, the company began making monochrome films in 1898. The popularity of these films, in particular those featuring a character named Winky, led to a film industry in West Yorkshire which for a time surpassed that of Hollywood in terms of productivity and originality. It is also believed the company invented film editing with the release in 1899 of The Kiss in the Tunnel.

In September 2010, on the 100th anniversary of the original launch of the postcards, the new owner Ian Wallace has relaunched the publication and sale of the postcards, with the Jane Evans Licensing Consultancy. Currently Mercury Print & Packaging, in Leeds have been granted the exclusive right to reprint and distribute.

Old Trafford, the largest football stadium in England with an 80,000 capacity, is opened

Nicknamed “The Theatre of Dreams” by Bobby Charlton, Old Trafford has been United’s home ground since 1910.

Before 1902, Manchester United were known as Newton Heath, during which time they first played their football matches at North Road and then Bank Street in Clayton. However, both grounds were blighted by wretched conditions, the pitches ranging from gravel to marsh, while Bank Street suffered from clouds of fumes from its neighbouring factories. Therefore, following the club’s rescue from near-bankruptcy and renaming, the new chairman John Henry Davies decided in 1909 that the Bank Street ground was not fit for a team that had recently won the First Division and FA Cup, so he donated funds for the construction of a new stadium. Not one to spend money frivolously, Davies scouted around Manchester for an appropriate site, before settling on a patch of land adjacent to the Bridgewater Canal, just off the north end of the Warwick Road in Old Trafford.

Designed by Scottish architect Archibald Leitch, who designed several other stadia, the ground was originally designed with a capacity of 100,000 spectators and featured seating in the south stand under cover, while the remaining three stands were left as terraces and uncovered. Including the purchase of the land, the construction of the stadium was originally to have cost £60,000 all told. However, as costs began to rise, to reach the intended capacity would have cost an extra £30,000 over the original estimate and, at the suggestion of club secretary J. J. Bentley, the capacity was reduced to approximately 80,000. Nevertheless, at a time when transfer fees were still around the £1,000 mark, the cost of construction only served to reinforce the club’s “Moneybags United” epithet, with which they had been tarred since Davies had taken over as chairman.

Construction was carried out by Messrs Brameld and Smith of Manchester and development was completed in late 1909. The stadium hosted its inaugural game on 19 February 1910, with United playing host to Liverpool. However, the home side were unable to provide their fans with a win to mark the occasion, as Liverpool won 4–3. A journalist at the game reported the stadium as “the most handsomest [sic], the most spacious and the most remarkable arena I have ever seen. As a football ground it is unrivalled in the world, it is an honour to Manchester and the home of a team who can do wonders when they are so disposed”.

1910 UK news events

Bamforths of Holmfirth begin publishing ‘saucy’ seaside postcards.

Cinematograph Act 1909 comes into effect providing for licensing of cinemas by local authorities.

Girl Guides’ Association founded.

New Birmingham Oratory building completed.

Admiralty Arch in London completed.

English aviator Claude Grahame-White lands his biplane on West Executive Avenue in Washington, D.C. and then lunches with United States Secretary of War Jacob M. Dickinson.

Charles Rolls makes the first successful return (or round-trip) flight over the English Channel.

English-born actor-aviator Robert Loraine makes the first aeroplane flight from Wales across the Irish Sea, although he actually lands some 200 feet (60 metres) short of the Irish coast in Dublin Bay.

Andrew Blain Baird makes the first powered monoplane flight in Scotland, at Ettrick Bay on the Isle of Bute in a self-built machine.

Welshman Ernest Willows makes the first airship crossing from England to France with Willows No. 3 City of Cardiff.

British aviation pioneer Cecil Grace vanishes over the English Channel during a flight from Calais, France, to Dover, England.

The London and South Western Railway introduces a new Continental service, Southampton-Havre.

15 January – a general election held in response to the House of Lords’ rejection of the 1909 budget results in a reduced Liberal Party majority (Liberals, 275 seats; Labour, 40; Irish Nationalists, 82; Unionists (the title preferred at this time by the Conservative Party), 273).

31 January – Dr. Crippen poisons his wife and buries her body in the cellar.

1 February – first labour exchanges open in the UK.

7 February – Dreadnought hoax: Horace de Vere Cole and members of the Bloomsbury Group make an “official visit” to the battleship HMS Dreadnought at Portland Harbour in disguise as a royal delegation from Abyssinia.

15 February – the Royal Aero Club is granted its “Royal” prefix.

19 February – Old Trafford, the largest football stadium in England with an 80,000 capacity, is opened. Manchester United’s first game there is a 4–3 home defeat to Liverpool in the Football League First Division.

March – King Edward VII falls very ill with bronchitis in Paris, France, returning to London a few weeks later.

31 March – Federation of Stoke-on-Trent: Administrative amalgamation of the six towns of The Potteries in north Staffordshire (Stoke-upon-Trent, Burslem, Tunstall, Hanley, Fenton and Longton) into the single county borough of Stoke-on-Trent, the first such merger in the history of local government in England.

April – it is reported that King Edward VII’s health has deteriorated further and he is likely to die soon.

4 April – a bill to abolish the legislative veto of the House of Lords is introduced in the Commons, starting a prolonged clash between the two Houses of Parliament.

27 April – the House of Commons passes David Lloyd George’s (1909) ‘People’s Budget’ for the second time; it is passed by House of Lords on 29 April.

28 April – Frenchman Louis Paulhan completes the Daily Mail’s 1910 London to Manchester air race in under 24 hours; the other competitor, Claude Grahame-White, is forced to retire.

6 May – George V succeeds to the British throne as King on the death of his father, Edward VII.

11 May – a firedamp explosion at Wellington Colliery, Whitehaven, in the Cumberland Coalfield, kills 136.

18 May – Earth passes through the tail of Halley’s Comet.

20 May – Funeral of Edward VII held, one of the largest and last gatherings of European royalty to take place, following the first public lying in state in Westminster Hall.

2 June – Charles Rolls becomes the first man to make a non-stop double crossing of the English Channel by plane, including the first eastbound flight. He is also the first British resident to make the crossing in a British-built plane.

15 June – Terra Nova Expedition: Robert Falcon Scott’s ship Terra Nova sets sail from Cardiff on an expedition with the purpose of undertaking scientific research and exploration along the coast and interior of Antarctica.

14–23 June – Edinburgh Missionary Conference is held in Scotland, presided over by Nobel Peace Prize recipient John R. Mott, launching the modern ecumenical movement and the modern missions movement.

21 June – Truro Cathedral, Cornwall, completed.

28 June – consecration of the Roman Catholic Westminster Cathedral in London.

9–10 July – ‘Fowler’s match’: the Eton v Harrow cricket match at Lord’s, known after the captain of Eton College, Robert St Leger Fowler, and described as “what might just be the greatest cricket match of all time”.

12 July – Charles Rolls becomes the first British aviation fatality when his French-built Wright aeroplane suffers a broken rudder at an altitude of 80 feet (24 meters) and crashes during a contest at Bournemouth.

29 July – in a legal cause célèbre, the Crown drops its charge against naval cadet George Archer-Shee for stealing a postal order.

31 July – Dr. Crippen arrested on board the SS Montrose after a telegraph is sent to the ship’s captain.

September – Vaughan Williams’ string orchestral work Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis is performed for the first time under the composer’s baton at Gloucester Cathedral for the Three Choirs Festival.

1 September – Ninian Park football stadium is opened in Cardiff, to serve Cardiff City F.C., who are members of the English Football League despite being based in Wales.

11 September – English-born actor-aviator Robert Loraine makes an aeroplane flight from Wales across the Irish Sea, landing some 200 feet (60 metres) short of the Irish coast in Dublin Bay.

5 October – Portugal becomes a republic; King Manuel II flees to England.

18 October – Dr. Crippen put on trial for murder at the Old Bailey.

First B-type double-decker bus, built and operated by the London General Omnibus Company, enters service. Designed by Frank Searle and considered the first mass-produced bus, around 2,800 are built up to 1919, displacing LGOC’s last horse buses by the end of 1911 and with examples in regular use up to 1926, about 900 seeing service on the Western Front (World War I).

20 October – RMS Olympic is launched at the Harland and Wolff Shipyards in Belfast.

22 October – Dr. Crippen found guilty of murder and sentenced to death.

Women chainmakers of Cradley Heath in the Black Country, led by Mary Macarthur, win a minimum wage following a ten-week strike; this effectively doubles their pay.

1 November – coal miners are balloted for strike action by the South Wales Miners’ Federation following a lock-out, resulting in 12,000 men working for the Cambrian Combine beginning a 10-month strike.

7–8 November – conflict between striking miners and police forces in the Rhondda, South Wales, leads to the Tonypandy Riots.

8 November–15 January 1911 – Manet and the Post-Impressionists exhibition at the Grafton Galleries in London, organised by Roger Fry, introduces the term Post-Impressionism.

18 November – Black Friday: 300 suffragettes clash with police outside Parliament over the failure of the Conciliation Bill.

23 November – Dr. Crippen hanged at Pentonville Prison, London.

26 November – suffragist Hugh Franklin attempts to whip Winston Churchill, the Home Secretary, on a train over the police treatment of suffragettes.

3–19 December – the second general election of 1910 is held for the electorate to resolve the battle of wills between the Houses of Commons and Lords. The results are: Liberals, 272; Labour, 42; Irish Nationalists, 84; Unionists, 272 — making a majority of 126 for restriction of the powers of the Lords and for Irish Home Rule. This will be the last British election on which regular voting extends over several days and the last in which woman cannot vote.

16 December – in Houndsditch, London, four (Latvian) anarchists shoot three policemen in botched raid on a jewellers – three are arrested, other members of the gang escape but are later (January 1911) cornered in the ‘siege of Sidney Street’.

21 December – the Pretoria Pit disaster: a massive underground explosion in a colliery belonging to the Hulton Colliery Company at Westhoughton in Lancashire, kills 344, with just one survivor, the second worst mining accident in England and the third worst in Britain.

26 December – London Palladium music hall opens.

Deaths

27 January – Thomas Crapper, inventor (born 1836)

3 May – Lottie Collins, singer and dancer (born 1865)

6 May – Edward VII (born 1841)

31 May – Elizabeth Blackwell, American-domiciled abolitionist and women’s rights activist (born 1821)

12 July – Charles Stewart Rolls, aviator and automobile manufacturer (born 1877)

13 August – Florence Nightingale, nurse (born 1820)

7 September – William Holman Hunt, painter (born 1827)

12 September – Cuthbert A. Brereton, civil engineer (born 1850)

19 September – William Maclagan, former Archbishop of York (born 1826)

29 December – Reginald Doherty, tennis player (born 1872)

Sport

1910 was the 21st season of County Championship cricket in England. Kent won a second successive title. Norfolk won the Minor Counties Championship, defeating Berkshire in the final challenge match. There were no overseas tours to England during the season, the English team having toured South Africa over the 1909–10 winter. A tour to the West Indies also took place over the 1910–11 winter.

9–10 July – ‘Fowler’s match’: the Eton v Harrow cricket match at Lord’s, known after the captain of Eton College, Robert St Leger Fowler, and described as “what might just be the greatest cricket match of all time”.

Aston Villa won their sixth top division title.

Lincoln CIty were re-admitted to the Football League after a season away, at the expense of Chesterfield.

Celtic extended their record run of consecutive league titles to six, while Dundee were Scottish Cup winners for the first time. On the international front, Scotland were outright British champions for the first time in eight years.

19 February – Old Trafford, the largest football stadium in England with an 80,000 capacity, is opened. Manchester United’s first game there is a 4–3 home defeat to Liverpool in the Football League First Division.

1 September – Ninian Park football stadium is opened in Cardiff, to serve Cardiff City F.C., who are members of the English Football League despite being based in Wales.

First Division – Aston Villa
Second Division – Manchester City
FA Cup – Newcastle United
Charity Shield – Newcastle United
Home Championship – Scotland
Scottish Football League – Celtic

Posted by brizzle born and bred on 2019-03-30 08:34:50

Tagged: , That Was the Year That Was – 1910 , 1910 , 1910 UK news headlines , UK , British , Britain , United Kingdom


Like it? Share with your friends!

0
Share via
1 share

What's Your Reaction?

hate hate
0
hate
confused confused
0
confused
fail fail
0
fail
fun fun
0
fun
geeky geeky
0
geeky
love love
0
love
lol lol
0
lol
omg omg
0
omg
win win
0
win
laundrytips

Comments

comments

Are You a LAUNDRY TIPS® Affiliate?

What are you waiting for :)
LAUNDRY TIPS® affiliates earn 35% commissions per sale and so can you!  (sign up below)
AVAIL NOW
Bonus:  Receive free ($197 value) tips & training on affiliate marketing when you become a LAUNDRY TIPS® affiliate.  Congratulations!
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS® Fashion

The Best Clean Fashion. Period.™
Sign up below for an exclusive coupon code you can use instantly on your first purchase :)
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
close-link

GREEN PRODUCTS

Special Bonus:  25% Off Your First Purchase at Babo
(Don't Miss This!)
Offer Expires In:
LAUNDRY TIPS® Limited Time Offer
Save on GREEN!
close-link
Don't Miss This!

LAUNDRY TIPS® Facebook Group!

Special Offers, Rewards & More!
Join Group!
LAUNDRY TIPS®
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

Get Your Wordpress Blog Up Fast ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
5
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

The Smart Way to Promote Your Blog in Just Ten Minutes Per Day ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
10
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

Learn the Secrets of Writing Blog Content that Sells ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
blog
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

Uncover the Real Secrets to Building 6-Figure Blogs ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
bloggers
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

Proven Strategies to Generating Premium Traffic for Free ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
blogging
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

Content Curation Mistakes ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
content
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

Learn the Secrets of Easy Content Creation ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
content
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

Explode Your Profits with Smart Content Marketing ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
content
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

Learn How to Boost Your Content Marketing Results ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
content
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

Copywriting Mistakes ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
copywriting
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

Learn the Top Secrets to Killer Copywriting ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
copywriting
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

How to Explode Your Income with Short Reports that take Under 2 Hours to Create ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
dynamite
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

Learn the Secrets of Guest Blogging for Big Traffic & Big Profits ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
partner
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

Powerful Strategies to Turn Visitors into Qualified Leads ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
power
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

Insider Secrets to Building High Profit Blogs ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
six
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

Learn the Secrets of Writing Faster than Ever ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
speed
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

These Mistakes Could Kill Your Blog ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
top
close-link
Fashion & More

LAUNDRY TIPS®

 

SHOP NOW!
close-link

LAUNDRY TIPS®

Find Out How You can Save Money and Focus on a Brighter Tomorrow by Going Green ($197 value for FREE but only while they last!)
Special Bonus (Don't Miss This!)

Shop on Amazon
Deals up to 100% Off
Receive rebates in 3 days
AVAIL NOW
This is a limited time offer
close-link
Hate Your Job?

Congratulations...You Will Love This!

 
(Don't Miss This!)
Learn More
close-image
Does Your Job Suck?

Quit Today & Work from Home!

 
(Don't Miss This!)
Learn More
close-image