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At this point the car is still not running. You can see that the rubber bellows between the air flow regulator and the intake manifold is still off. That must mean that I was still trouble shooting the fuel injection system.

Below are the details of my efforts to troubleshoot the CI system after I’d gotten the new fuel tank, sender unit, and fuel lines in. Thanks very much to Bruce Young and Art Benstein of Brickboard.com…..I would have scrapped the project at this point if it hadn’t been for their advice and patience.
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I’m working on a 1977 242DL that has been in outside storage (non running) since December 1999. It was my daily driver prior to that.

To date I have replaced
-fuel tank
-fuel sender unit, internal pump & sock filter
-Fuel lines to external pump
-Fuel lines from tank and accumulator to engine bay
-The external pump is original and operates, but is noisy and I haven’t made any attempt to determine if it is operating to spec.
-Accumulator is original

After completing the work above, I tried to start the car today and got only several backfires and one explosive detonation in the engine compartment. While very stimulating and offering the exciting prospect that the patient can, with expenditure of sufficient time and money be brought back to life, it was ultimately disappointing.

Next I went to the factory manuals and started through the complete checkout of the CI system. I confirmed that the cold start injector is firing for the appropriate length of time and then shutting off.

I pulled the bellows off the air mass meter and it (the bellows) was in good condition. I put the ignition to the accessory position so the fuel pumps were running and moved the venturi plate upwards but didn’t hear the injectors cut on or off.

In the course of monkeying around with the air mass meter I noticed raw fuel smell in the engine bay and noticed a pool of fuel around the number two injector. I took this injector off and put the ignition in accessory (with the venturi plate in the rest position) and the injector immediately opened and sprayed continuously. Checked the remaining three injectors and another one also sprays when the ignition is in accessory, but it cuts on after a several second delay. One of the remaining two injectors gets wet and drips after ten seconds or so and the other one stays dry.

My questions:
-does fuel flow through an injector with the venturi plate in the rest position definitely mean that the fuel distributor is bad (as the factory manual indicates)?
-Why would one injector start spraying immediately, another after a several second delay, and a third only get wet and drip after an even longer delay?
-If this condition is due to the plunger hanging up in the fuel distributor because of varnish or oxidation, is there any hope of cleaning it? Haynes says that nothing can be done, Bentley indicates that it can be carefully cleaned with raw fuel and put back together.
-If I need to replace it, does anyone have recommendations on any of the replacement options? RockAuto.com has everything from a Bosch unit ($800 or so, and out of the question), to under $200 for a rebuilt unit that their photo makes look pretty gloppy and suspect. I’m assuming that a salvaged distributor would be just as much at risk of being useless and could set me back a good deal of time in finding that out.
-Am I totally off target in suspecting the distributor and is there something else I should be looking to eliminate first.

Thanks very much in advance!

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“-does fuel flow through an injector with the venturi plate in the rest position definitely mean that the fuel distributor is bad (as the factory manual indicates)?”

• Not necessarily, in your case. I could be that the control plunger is gummed up and not following the airflow (not “venturi”) plate down to the rest position. Or someone may have been playing with the 3mm hex setscrew adjustment on the airflow plate, and turned it way too far clockwise.

“-Why would one injector start spraying immediately, another after a several second delay, and a third only get wet and drip after an even longer delay?”

• Is this with the airflow plate at rest, as above? If so, that should be corrected before you try to diagnose individual line/injector flow. Given the history, contamination in the FD or injectors is possible.

Once the plunger question is answered or known to be OK, an initial setting procedure for the 3mm setscrew will also test for roughly even flow from each of the 4 FD ports.

“-If this condition is due to the plunger hanging up in the fuel distributor because of varnish or oxidation, is there any hope of cleaning it? Haynes says that nothing can be done, Bentley indicates that it can be carefully cleaned with raw fuel and put back together.”

• The plunger can be removed by taking the fuel lines off the FD, then taking the FD off the airflow meter (see Bentley 240-14 Fig. 24 for your type). Holding the FD in both hands, with a large socket on the underside where the plunger will (hopefully) come out, smack the FD w/socket down on a hard surface. It might take 2 or 3 smacks, but the plunger should come out. Clean with something like lacquer thinner, then rinse with gas and replace it in the FD. Use very light oil instead of gas for storage.

Don’t try to swap in a plunger from another FD. Each plunger has only one unique home.
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I removed the fuel distributor this morning and tried to free up the piston from the cylinder using the technique you recommended, but it is gummed in there tight. After about a dozen smacks onto a granite slab it moved only about 2-3mm and wouldn’t come out any further. I used a shop towel and some plier to try to gently pull it out, but nothing. The little bit that is showing is covered in sticky varnish.

Can you recommend any procedure to get it out of the cylinder, or should I just start hunting for rebuilts?
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My first thought is to gently tap it back in a little, and set it facing up where you can keep dribbling acetone or lacquer thinner on it for several minutes.

After that, try the “smacking” again, just enough to get some movement. Then add solvent and tap it back in. Repeat the sequence several times — hoping to gain a little more range of movement each time.

I have a few old FD’s that I bench tested several years ago and packed away.
What is the bosch # on yours?
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I guess that great minds think alike; I went back to the barn after I posted the last message and did exactly what you suggested, but using the magical WD-40. After about another dozen smacks or so I was able to free up the plunger. There was a ring of varnish near the end of it (just beyond the conical part). I cleaned that off with WD-40 and am going to leave it for a few days (due to travel) and will clean everything off with fresh gas and start reassembling it on Saturday.

Some more questions for you:
-Do I need to be concerned that smacking the unit to free the plunger will have caused any damage to the unit?
-Is fuel pressure used to somehow return the plunger to the rest/downward position? My plunger is moving pretty freely now, but when holding it with the plunger downwards I have to jiggle it a bit for the plunger to drop out of the bottom.
-When I reassemble it, must I use new copper washers around all of the banjo fittings, or is it ok to re-use the old ones?

The model number of my FD is 0438 100 005.
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I don’t think WD40 has much residual lubricant, but probably OK for short term.

Some more questions for you:
-Do I need to be concerned that smacking the unit to free the plunger will have caused any damage to the unit?
* I doubt it, having done it a few times with no problems.

-Is fuel pressure used to somehow return the plunger to the rest/downward position? My plunger is moving pretty freely now, but when holding it with the plunger downwards I have to jiggle it a bit for the plunger to drop out of the bottom.
• Yes, a “Control Pressure” is bled off in the FD and applied to the top of the plunger. It acts as a counter force and “damper” to the airflow plate’s upward movement. The CP also influences the amount of fuel to the injectors for a given rise in the airflow plate. And since the CP can be varied by the CP Regulator (based on temperature), it also allows varying plunger rise for a given airflow, and thus “fine tunes” the mixture around the “coarser” 3mm plate adjustment.**

-When I reassemble it, must I use new copper washers around all of the banjo fittings, or is it ok to re-use the old ones?
• I usually reuse them, snugging first, then tighter if needed, and have a collection of old ones to pick from. I do have the bosch numbers for all sizes but have never took the time to find a supplier.

** Most of what I know about K-Jet came from a Bentley book I strongly recommend. It covers all Bosch FI systems, is very well written, and only costs about $25. It’s called “Bosch Fuel Injection & Engine Management” Bentley stock number GFIB.

I just searched on bentley book gfib and and this was at the top. $22.95

Yes, I have an 005 FD.
And am adding a poor picture of the tiny filter that should be at the bottom of each injector port. You might want to pick them out with a jeweler’s screwdriver to see if they stopped any crud from the FD.
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I can’t thank you enough for the quick replies and the advice. I do have the Bosch book (collected a bunch of stuff before starting this project), but didn’t think to go back to it after I started tracing the faults using the factory manuals. I’ll pull it out this week and start reading through it now that I’ve got some hand’s on experience (when I first looked through it it was pretty intimidating).

Since this area is such a bear to access, should I do anything with the fuel pressure regulator while I’ve got it in plain sight? I have no reason to suspect there’s a problem with it at this point, but given that everything in the fuel system from back to front so far has been problematic, I’m wondering if I’ll get the jillion things that connect to the intake manifold back together only to find that I have to yank it out again.
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Don’t be intimidated by that book. Your part (now) is less than 1/5th of it.

“Since this area is such a bear to access, should I do anything with the fuel pressure regulator while I’ve got it in plain sight?”

Nothing to do until it’s hooked up and you can put the pressure gauge on it. That’ll be fun the first time or two. And btw, on the K-jet it’s called a Control Pressure Regulator (CPR), or in most Bosch books, the Warm Up Regulator (WUR).

I like WUR best because that’s when it’s most active — low pressure when cold, letting the plunger come up farther for a rich mixture, then higher pressure when warm for the leaned-out running mixture.

You will have to take the larger fitting off and interpose the pressure gauge hose, using fittings supplied with the Gauge. It get’s easier, believe me.
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I’ll see if I can pull out the little filters and clean them up while I’m at it and will forego any monkeying with the WUR until my JC Whitney CIS pressure test kit arrives and I can scope everything out.

In terms of mechanical function, I should be able to leave the intake manifold off while performing all of the pressure testing, right? I sure hope so!

I also hope that it gets easier from here on out. I figured it would be hard to get the car started after its extended hibernation, but this has caused me to go way, way, way beyond my comfort zone. Until now my greatest mechanical achievements have been the replacement of easily accessible components like water pumps, radiators, master cylinders, brake pads, and stuff like that.
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In terms of mechanical function, I should be able to leave the intake manifold off while performing all of the pressure testing, right? I sure hope so!

Yes, you can run the pump for pressure testing by jumpering fuses 5 and 7 (left side contacts, for normal current flow), or jumpering at the relay plug, 30 (Red) to 87 (W/R). I have a long jumper made up, with a switch at the underhood end.

The battery should be charged (or at least not run way down) for pressure tests.
The actual testing should take only 3-4 minutes to know what you have. See Bentley 240-6 for approximate Control Pressure, depending on ambient.

And I just remembered, the jumpering I gave you above will run the pumps, but it won’t put voltage on the WUR heater (to put the WUR thru its cold-to-warm transition). For that you must jumper at the relay plug, so that 87 (R/Y) AND 87b (Blue) both get voltage from 30(R). Then you test for about 2 minutes to get the warm WUR pressure value. The Bentley/Bosch book has more on this I think.
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Spent a good portion of the day reassembling the fuel lines and pressure testing. Here’s the rundown:

-Cleaned all banjo fittings and dried with compressed air.

-blew out all fuel lines to injectors liberally with compressed air.

-mounted new Bosch injectors and injector seals to lines

-mounted fuel distributor to air metering unit and reattached all fuel lines

-charged battery fully

-turned on fuel pump and lifted sensor plate on air metering unit and listened for buzz of injectors. No buzzing. Repeated with same result.

-attached CI pressure testing rig between control pressure regulator and fuel distributor as specified in factory manual 2(23) operation B14. Turned on fuel pump, opened test valve, and bled test rig. Pressure observed was approx 42 psi vice the 65-77 it should be.

-Checked for fuel leaks and noted none in engine compartment or elsewhere. There was some very slow dripping of a banjo fitting where it connected to the test rig, but I dismissed that as a possible cause of the low pressure reading.

-I’m going to continue going through the tests for low pressure as specified in manual 2(23) beginning with operation B54. I’d appreciate your thoughts on the most likely cause for the low pressure.
–Internal fuel pump is from salvaged car, but pump and sending unit it is mounted on appear (quite literally) nearly new and I believe they were NOS (the sending unit definitely is Volvo).
–External/main pump is the original and runs, but is very noisy.
–Accumulator is original, no leaks noted
–All fuel lines from the tank to the engine compartment are new (braided stainless)
–Pressure regulator valve on the fuel distributor has not been monkeyed with. I removed, inspected, and cleaned it in fresh gasoline as specified in the factory manuals. I didn’t remove the shims and was extremely careful not to lose any when dis-assembling it (i.e. I’m sure it is set up as it was before the car stopped running).
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That’s a nice, well-detailed outline of your testing, but it would help to know your location, or more specifically the ambient temperature. I base this on that 47psi reading, wondering you might actually be seeing Control pressure? That could happen if (a) the gauge valve was open by mistake (rather than closed) and (b) the CPR/WUR plug had not been disconnected at the start, thus allowing allowing the Control pressure to rise to a warm level (just a couple of minutes will do it).

The fact that I don’t have your Volvo manual to refer to also hampers things a bit. But you also have the Bentley-Bosch book (I’ll call it B-B), so I’ll comment based on that. Here’s the testing sequence I’d suggest:

1) Starting with a COLD engine/system, be prepared to monitor battery for an 11.5V minimum during testing.

2) B-B, 6-17, last paragraph. Disconnect plugs at CPR and Aux Air Valve (AAV).

3) B-B, 6-12/13. Do the “Delivery Test” to be sure the pump can deliver the volume needed (whatever your book says — my guess 850cc in 30 seconds). Then read 4.2 “Fuel Pressure Flowthrough” and do “Testing Control Pressure Throughflow as described (160 to 240cc in 60 seconds). If that’s not right, it can bias the CP high or low.

4) B-B, 6-17-19. Now do the Pressure tests as described, starting with “System” (line) pressure. I assume your book has the cold-to-warm Control Pressure chart that’s right for your CPR.

Comments on your test results:

-turned on fuel pump and lifted sensor plate on air metering unit and listened for buzz of injectors. No buzzing. Repeated with same result.
• Maybe air needs to be bled out of FD?

-I’m going to continue going through the tests for low pressure as specified in manual 2(23) beginning with operation B54. I’d appreciate your thoughts on the most likely cause for the low pressure.
• Again, be sure it’s not Control pressure, and that the delivery volume is OK before trying to raise the system pressure.

NOTE: I’m guessing you are using the Ignition key to control the pump on/off, which is possible if the airflow safety contacts are missing the 2-pin plug that puts them in the circuit. That plug should be nearby to the airflow meter—a White and a Black wire I think. Plugging that in and out would save you from going back and forth to the key.

That’s all I can think of for now. In the meantime I’ll see if I can scare up a PDF of that manual you are using, so we’ll be “on the same page”.
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Gotcha on the factory manuals; I’ll try to work from the Bentley manual from now on (or at least describe the factory manual test procedures fully) so we have a common frame of reference. Also, I’m located in southern NH, and the ambient temp during testing yesterday was about 45F and today it was about 30F.

I did not disconnect the WUR wiring, so that might have biased the test results (factory manual doesn’t reference that, or if it did, I missed it).

However, got some more data for you based on some tinkering this afternoon, and it may shed some more light on the issue (which I’m beginning to think is the main fuel pump that sat on the dormant car for the last 10 years).

-I figured that I might as well eliminate the possibility that the low pressure was due to a bad in-tank fuel pump since the manual’s next three steps were related to checking its function (amperage draw, audible signs of operation, etc.), and since I had previously ordered an aftermarket in-tank pump from FCP Groton. I removed the fuel sending unit and swapped the pumps and put everything back together, checked for leaks, and then performed the same pressure test as described yesterday (also with the WUR wiring connected). THis time the pressure was down 2 psi to 40, so I assume that eliminated the possibility that the in-tank pump is the culprit (though the aftermarket and old pump are/were really, really loud, much louder than I remember when the car used to be on the road).

-The next step in the factory manual is to test the fuel delivery volume by disconnecting the return line in the engine compartment and running the pump for 30 seconds and measuring the fuel delivered. Proper delivery volume for a 77 B21F is supposed to be a minimum of .8 liters. I ran the test twice and measured .150 liters. I’m assuming at this point that the problem must be the main fuel pump, and am about the order a rebuilt OEM unit from FCP Groton…should I or would it be better to hold off?

-Also, when I ran the fuel volume delivery test above, I happened to notice that the test gauge was reading 30 psi (even after the pump stopped running and before I reconnected the return line), which I thought was kind of odd since the system was open on the return side. Or is there a check valve in the WUR that would account for this?? Guess maybe it’s time to start delving into the Bentley Bosch CI book.
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“-Also, when I ran the fuel volume delivery test above, I happened to notice that the test gauge was reading 30 psi (even after the pump stopped running and before I reconnected the return line), which I thought was kind of odd since the system was open on the return side.”

I’ve also experienced that “hang on” pressure at the end. Enough so that I figured it was normal, but never took time to dig into the reason for it. It would slowly drop off when I cyled the gauge valve back and forth. And you might have reason to question that new tank pump, because Art Benstein recently got one with reversed polarity at the terminals, which made it a sucker. He may jump in here with more details.

I don’t have anything to add at this point except that I feel it’s important to first establish that (1) the pump can deliver the specified volume and (2) the FD “flow-thru” volume to the CPR is within the 160 to 240cc range described in the B-B book page 6-12. And that all these preliminary tests (up until measuring the warm Control pressure) be done with the CPR heater unplugged.

I’m an early riser, so I’m turning the lamp down about now. If anything comes to me in a dream I’ll be back in the AM. Double check the use of that gauge valve, as it’s quite possible that 47psi you saw was really Control (not System) pressure, and was influenced by CPR warm-up due to heater being plugged in for a couple of minutes.
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I’m stumped, making no apparent progress, and getting increasingly confused and frustrated. Here are the results of the tests that I ran this morning:
-Environmental conditions/battery charge: 55 degrees F/12.77 volts
-Bosch-Bentley (B-B)6-17. Discovered that I had installed the pressure test rig backwards for last weekend’s tests and remedied this. Bled system and moved valve open/closed for 10 second intervals several times as per B-B to ensure no air in system. Read system pressure and got reading of 38 psi. WUR power was disconnected and when I switched the valve to check control pressure, reading was identical.
-Got distracted referring to various manuals and noted factory manual tests to ensure correct electrical function of WUR. Checked the voltage of connector for WUR as well as ground and WUR continuity. All checked out normal (11.86 volts at connection with fuel pumps running and battery indicating 12.16 volts. WUR resistance measured at 20.2 ohms, factory manual indicates normal range to be 20-30 ohms).
-Figured there might be reversed polarity of the FCP Groton fuel pump as reported in Art’s post from last week and removed the line feeding the main fuel pump and turned pumps on and got no fuel flow coming from tank. Removed in tank pump and was preparing to test function outside of tank to see whether it was sucking or pumping and found that it was now inoperable (I had swapped it in for what looked like a very new but used probably Bosch ((“Made in the UK”)) in tank pump that had been mounted on the salvaged fuel sending unit I bought). No clue why…it had been operating last weekend when I installed it (at that time I disconnected juice to main pump and could hear the in-tank pump buzzing away). I ran test leads from the FCP Groton pump to a battery and it was/is dead as a doornail.
-Re-installed the used in-tank pump referenced above and tested its function. Pumped goodly volume of fuel to line feeding main pump. Assumed that this would now result in a system pressure reading closer to the normal range of 65 psi.
-Went back to pressure testing and bled pressure gauge as per B-B and then took system reading again. Down to 30 psi now!?!?!?!? Same pressure showed when I switched valve to read control pressure?!?!?!?
-Performed fuel pump test on the main (external) pump as per B-B 4 11-12. There were 12.02 volts at the connector. Tested ground continuity by running a test lead from the ground screw in the trunk where all the fuel pumps ground to the negative terminal of the main pump wiring harness and got reading of 0.2 ohms. Ran test lead to ground in engine compartment to main pump harness negative terminal and got reading of 0.2 ohms.
-Performed fuel volume test again (WUR wiring disconnected)and with pressure test rig connected. No fuel coming out of return line. Tried again with WUR wiring connected with same result. Removed test rig and both of the return lines (from WUR to return side of fuel distributor and the large one from the return side of the FD). Blew out both return lines with compressed air.
-Re-installed all fuel lines (fuel pressure test gauge removed), leaving the return line near the fuel filter open for fuel volume test and powered up pumps again; no fuel flow on return side.

What does all of this mean?
-Based on the low system pressure readout and what I assume is adequate voltage running to main pump and good ground to main pump, I’m inclined to think that the main pump is bad (again, it sat on the car, dormant and outside for about 10 years).
-But then again, there’s obviously something wrong elsewhere as well, since I’m now getting no fuel on the return side of the system. Could the WUR be mechanically fried so that no fuel is returning? I also don’t see how a bad WUR could lead to incorrect system pressure readings (obviously it’s isolated from the system being tested when the pressure test valve is closed so as to read system pressure). Last weekend when I did the fuel volume test (with WUR connected to power) I had .15 litres of fuel after 30 seconds of operation. How could anything that I did in the tests above have altered the result?
-Could the FD be bad? When I re-installed it the plunger was moving freely. Today with pressure in the system I lifted the air flow sensor plate and noted steady resistance while lifting (assume that’s normal since there is pressure on the top of the plunger). When I let the sensor plate fall down it “bounces” slightly as it should, and after a fraction of a second I can hear the FD plunger come to rest on the control arm (or whatever it’s called).

Any help you can provide would be very welcome; beginning to wonder if this project is beyond my abilities.

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Cheer up, I see you making progress. I still get that gauge mixed up with infrequent usage. After one reading (paragraphs please! ;-), it looks like a delivery problem causing the low 38psi pressure. And I think the WUR might be the same because the pressure wasn’t high enough (or ambient temp low enough) for the WUR’s “bleed off” return to produce a different Control Pressure value.

“Re-installed the used in-tank pump referenced above and tested its function. Pumped goodly volume of fuel to line feeding main pump.”
• Off hand, I’m not aware of a ” goodly volume” Tank pump spec. But the Main pump spec (Bentley 230-3 and 4) is 1 liter in 30 seconds. And since that 1 liter has to come from the Tank pump, that’s about what I’d expect from that little sucker pumper too.

“Assumed that this would now result in a system pressure reading closer to the normal range of 65 psi.
• Me too. But not until we’ve proven that the Tank pump can deliver what the Main pump needs. BTW, how is the battery holding up? I think the Bosch book wants 11.5V minimum. That’s while pumping, not a static reading. So that’s a consideration.

“Performed fuel pump test on the main (external) pump as per B-B 4 11-12. There were 12.02 volts at the connector.”
• B-B 4 is “pulsed injection” (LH) Theory. The values may be close, but best to stay in B-B 6, Continuous Injection Maintenance. And I wonder what that 12.02V dropped to with pump running?

… more coming as long as I can edit in (~2 hour window). Just wanted you to know I’m here and still reading…

EDIT follow on…

“-Re-installed all fuel lines (fuel pressure test gauge removed), leaving the return line near the fuel filter open for fuel volume test and powered up pumps again; no fuel flow on return side.
-Based on the low system pressure readout and what I assume is adequate voltage running to main pump and good ground to main pump, I’m inclined to think that the main pump is bad (again, it sat on the car, dormant and outside for about 10 years).”
• Yes, the Main pump is subject to speculation, given it’s history. But without knowing the “working” battery voltage and the “measured” Tank pump delivery volume, all we can do is speculate at this point.

“-But then again, there’s obviously something wrong elsewhere as well, since I’m now getting no fuel on the return side of the system.”
• Agreed. That’s a mystery here too, for now. Art?

“Could the WUR be mechanically fried so that no fuel is returning?”
• No, that’s not how it works. The Main return is (should be) from the FD. The WUR return line just taps in at that point.

“Last weekend when I did the fuel volume test (with WUR connected to power) I had .15 litres of fuel after 30 seconds of operation. How could anything that I did in the tests above have altered the result?”
• Hard to speculate here. Having the WUR (heater) powered was not right at that time, but that’s not a volume delivery factor that I can see. Since then, the Tank pump that was used is now dead, and an unproven used one is in it’s place.

“…beginning to wonder if this project is beyond my abilities”
• Not from where I see things. Tomorrow is another day. And maybe Art will chime in.

EDIT #2
Glad Art mentioned that his sender was mis-wired, not the pump. I meant to run that fact by you, since your sender is also new. I’d suggest you verify that yours is NOT like the bad one Art recently got, as shown below.
(Although I sorta hope it is, since that seems to be where we’re stuck.)
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Thanks for the additional suggestions. Based on the test results today, I am assuming that the problem (or one of the problems) is the main fuel pump. Here’s what I came up with:

Charged the battery last night and tested it before I began work today; it was 13.27 volts at rest. Ambient temp in the barn is about 55 degrees.

Removed the line from the in-tank pump at the main pump and ran the pump for 30 seconds. It delivered a little over a litre of gas.

Removed the fuel line between the main pump and the filter (I ran stainless braided line and there’s a junction above the rear axle) and did the same volume test and got the same result (a little more than a litre in 30 secs).

Connected the pressure test rig to the fuel line between the main pump and filter (would have done it after the filter, but 30 minutes of searching thru various nipples and bushings at the local hardware store didn’t yield any combination that I could work to make a connection there) and fired both of the pumps and bled the test lines. Result: 41 psi. This is a bit higher than yesterday, but I’m guessing the difference might be due to the higher voltage to the pumps because of the just-charged battery.

Tested operating voltage at the main pump and got a reading of 11.62 volts.

Where do you recommend that I go from here? Is it time to pull the trigger on a new main pump? If so, can you recommend a source for the OEM type for this year (honking big Bosch thing)? I see that FCP Groton has rebuilts in its offering…heard anything about them? If I replace the main pump should I also go ahead and get a new accumulator, or should I continue to use the original since it isn’t leaking? If I can avoid replacing it that would be my preference.
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Unless Art sees something else, the main pump does look bad. I have an old one on my test bench rig (below) that I just tested at a wavering 62-65 psi, running a kerosene techron mix with 13.4 volts from a charger-assisted battery. First time run in months, and with too-thin, jury-rigged wiring.
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I swapped out the fuel pump this morning and then tested the system and control pressures and fuel delivery volume. I’ve still got a problem somewhere and based on the factory manuals the WUR seems most likely:

-Battery at 12.5 volts at beginning of testing

-Temperature 50 degrees

-System pressure: a wavering 62-64 which I figure should be close enough to the minimal threshold of 65 (is it?)

-Control pressure: identical reading to system pressure. WUR was disconnected from power at all times

-Fuel delivery volume: .5 liters in 30 seconds (factory manual says it should be at least .8). I’ve got a brand new aftermarket fuel filter on the car and the only gas that’s been run through it is new gas fed from a new tank through new fuel lines. Should I be concerned about this at this point, or fix the control pressure first and then retest for volume??

-I also performed the control pressure throughflow test (B-B 6-12 para 4.2) twice and got the same result (200cc delivered in exactly 60 seconds). Since B-B says that 150cc to 240cc range indicates FD is OK, does this now mean that the WUR is certainly bad?

I referred to the factory manuals for troubleshooting in case of control pressure being too high and it is pretty straight-forward: blow out the return lines (which I did last weekend) and if the pressure doesn’t test within specs, then retest with a new WUR.

Do you have any alternative recommendations?
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“-System pressure: a wavering 62-64 which I figure should be close enough to the minimal threshold of 65 (is it?)”
• The wavering pressure isn’t ideal, but it should work. For how long is another question.

-Control pressure: identical reading to system pressure. WUR was disconnected from power at all times.

I referred to the factory manuals for troubleshooting in case of control pressure being too high and it is pretty straight-forward: blow out the return lines (which I did last weekend) and if the pressure doesn’t test within specs, then retest with a new WUR.”

I’ve got the same problem with the WUR on my test rig. You could try taking it apart, hoping to eliminate whatever is blocking the return internally. That sometimes works, but mine has been apart 3 times and will pass 20±psi air, but not a drop of fuel. I didn’t think to try a reverse flush. That maybe worth a try if you can rig something.

You might start another thread looking for ideas and/or a used WUR. I got rid of my spares last year but don’t remember who got them.
——————-
FCP Groton has rebuilt WURs for the 76-77 for $68.83, which seems like a ridiculously low price (www.fcpgroton.com/product-exec/product_id/5313/nm/1976_19…).

I’m going to take the old one out tomorrow and rip it apart and see what I can do with it; if I can’t figure anything out I’m going to order the FCP reman one so that I can swap it out this week.
—————
The rebuilt WUR arrived and I couldn’t wait to see if I was finally through with this pressure testing hoo-hah, so I put it in, hooked up the test gauge, plopped in the newly-recharged battery, fired up the pumps, bled the air out of the system, and have an entirely new, unwelcome, and unexpected result:

-System pressure: where it previously held steady at a jittery 62-64 psi, it’s now oscillating wildly between a high of 42 psi and a low around 26 or so. It slowly builds up to 42 and then the drops suddenly back down and starts building up again. Did the main pump suddenly decide to go keerflooie, or could it be the check valve all of a sudden!?!?

-Control pressure: temperature in the barn is about an even 40 degrees and the temp of the WUR is probably a bit below that. I got a control pressure reading of about 12 which seems to be OK (the factory manuals only chart pressure down to about 50 degrees, but if I extrapolate downwards this would seem to be in the right range.
————————
How about removing and “gutting” the check valve (for now)?

It’s only meant to aid warm starts (minimize chance of vapor lock), and the accumulator usually holds residual pressure OK.
————————-
ust to help anyone who might be crazy enough to wade this far down the thread, I identified the problem with the pulsating (peaking at 42 psi then dropping to the 20s and building slowly back up). The low pressure line from the in-tank pump to the main pump was kinked.

Unkinked the line and had steady system pressure at about 64 psi.

The rebuilt WUR is bad, though; it’s delivering a constant control pressure of 12 psi, regardless of ambient temp and also regardless of how long it is connected to power.
—————————-
In regard to the reversed polarity, it was an aftermarket sender assembly that was wired wrong at the factory. The pump itself was OK. Bogging, crawls up hill (long post) Check out the reply from Afton Crafton. Pure BTDT.

But that brings up a concern I had earlier – that the noise, coupled with low pressure and volume, may lead you to replace a very reliable (and expensive) component, the main pump, simply because it is not being fed enough fuel (like in my case) or enough electricity.

Paul, if you’re set on doing it, at least do a volume test at the main pump inlet – testing the volume of the tank pump. In order to provide close to a liter from the main pump, it must be given the same amount or more. Also, be sure the main pump is getting full battery voltage.

Here’s a link to the notes I made on measuring pressure, done on a 79. Using the K-jet Fuel Pressure Test Kit

—————————-
Thanks very much for the link to the post on the bad wiring on FCP aftermarket in-tank pumps. I’m holding off on buying any new components until I run the volume tests at the tank as you suggest, and until I run the pressure tests properly. I’ll report back results next weekend. Thanks again for your advice!
————————
Managed to carve out some quality time with the car today and got those relay numbers for you. They are 0332 209 158 (this replaced the original 0332 204 110, and I confirmed the new application by calling two separate dealers before procuring the part), and 0332 015 006 (replaced the original relay with the same part number).

Also, the info I gave you about pumps running when the ignition was in the “I” position was faulty; I looked at the ignition key cylinder today and the pumps run when the key is in the “II” position. Not sure if this makes the issue any less troublesome, as the engine is obviously not running in this position either.

Unfortunately my pressure test kit won’t arrive until the middle of next week, so I consoled myself by doing a thorough cleaning of the fuel distributor, to include the pressure regulating piston (operations E37 and E38 in the factory manual), and blew the entire unit out with pressurized air before storing it in a zip lock baggie until the test kit comes in and I reassemble everything.

I also decided to spring for a new set of injectors so that I don’t have to kick myself down the road for not doing so when I had things broken down to this level. The originals were 0437 502 007s and I decided to pocure them locally (though they were available much cheaper online at FCP Groton). The local Bosch distributor advised that Bosch had been replacing the 007s with an 015 (which corresponded to the application info online at FCP Groton and RockAuto.com), and when they went to order that they were told that 0437 502 024 is the new application. I’m leery about all of the part number swapping….but guess that goes with the territory on an old clunker.
———————
Those relay numbers look OK but they’ve sure evolved thru several changes since the original pair of 0 332 204 110’s. I think some of it came with the introduction of the added “lift pump” in the tank. Was yours so retrofitted?

Just be sure to use the 158 as the “Main” relay (grey wire on 30), with the 006 (grey on 86) feeding the pump (pumps?).
—–
Based on your recommendations I’m going to remove the FD and check/clean the plunger next. The car was running when it went dormant, and I’m certain that the hex setscrew adjustment on the airflow plate.

I’ll post results here once I get that sorted (hopefully tomorrow since it’s a holiday).
——————

Posted by didenpx on 2011-12-09 15:23:48

Tagged: , Volvo , 242DL , 1977 , Bosch , CI , fuel , injection , troubleshooting


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